Nashville Judge Tells Cops “You Have NO Lawful Basis To Arrest Occupy Protesters!”

Occupy Nashville

Tennessee Highway Patrol Troopers arrested dozens of demonstrators in the Occupy Nashville
movement peacefully just after 3 a.m. Friday and sealed off Legislative Plaza, but a judge ruled after 5 a.m. that they will be released after he ruled that demonstrators did not have enough time to comply to new permit rules.  Yesterday, Tennessee changed the rules on demonstrations on the land around Legislative Plaza and the Capitol. The new Capitol rules prohibit camping and require demonstrations to have a permit, get insurance and operate from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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8 comments on “Nashville Judge Tells Cops “You Have NO Lawful Basis To Arrest Occupy Protesters!”

  1. The title makes it sound great, like it precedent setting news. But infact, what the judge is saying doesn’t translate into a show of the judge supporting the right for them to be there, but rather, only that they had to be first served with prior warning. The dance of chasing papers. I was hoping that this video was going to be more ground breaking than simply scolding the cops for not having first sought an injunction and delivered formal warning, as most of the police seem to be doing elsewhere. Bummer.

    • The way things have evolved since the enactment of “the Patriot Act”, I’m surprised that any judge would question ANY action of ANY policeman.

      In a way, I see what you’re saying, but at least this judge let those who arrested these people and those who gave the orders that they do NOT have carte blanche rights to do whatever they please to silence these inconvenient protesters. If the law requires prior notice of a particular interval, there is nothing about this situation that precludes those rights of prior notification.

      From another point of view, this judge actually did what he was supposed to do; so what. Well, where so many judges have become sock puppets for the police in the name of national security and the (anti)patriot(ic) act, it IS surprising to see one stand up and remind the police that the same rules of due process apply to this situation as they did once upon a time, before 9/11.

      In a day where the legal concepts like probable cause have died, justified by the (bogus) War on (to create more) Terror, I give this judge a pat on the back for doing the right thing; for all to see now on Youtube!

  2. This is a disappointing action by the Nashville governing units, Police and Courts, that continually try to silence the Occupy Protests by eroding our Constitutional Rights through underhanded means.

  3. So, let me get this straight, the first amendment says you have freedom of speech only if you can afford to buy insurance for when you plan to exercise it? Huh? This is profoundly troubling.

  4. That is interesting considering the 1st amendment clearly “PROHIBITS THE MAKING OF ANY LAW…INTERFERING WITH THE RIGHT TO PEACEABLY ASSEMBLE or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances,” which is precisely what the people are doing; thus, this judge’s ruling is clearly unconstitutional. Agree with their cause or not, the Bill of Rights is the only thing that protects our freedom and if we allow it to be destroyed, we have nothing left. We should be protecting these rights! Without them, we are not the ‘land of the free’ and if we idly sit back and allow this contract to be destroyed, then we also are not the ‘land of the brave,’ so where does that leave us?

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